Heritage

In The Press: A Hodinkee Writer Revisits His First Watch

This nostalgic editorial looks back at an event that many of us probably remember as well — a kid’s first watch. In the case of James Stacey, a senior writer for Hodinkee, it was our Timex Ironman (a model from the beginning of the INDIGLO® era) that first sparked his love for the world of watches and led him to a career in the industry.

Read an excerpt below or get the full story here, and view a fun TV advertisement from the era detailing the launch of INDIGLO® technology.

“If you can, think back to 1994. Given the path that my life has taken, it was an important year in the life of a young boy obsessed with a great many things, including the underwater world, cameras, Playmobile, LEGO, and just about anything that glowed in the dark. 1994 was also the year I asked for my first watch.

Early in the year, I was confronted with a dilemma of great magnitude – how to spend the birthday money I received from my grandmother. For a soon-to-be eight-year-old, there is no power more nectarine in its sweetness than one’s birthday cash. Mine came in two parts. I wanted to see the 1994, large-dog comedy sequel Beethoven’s 2nd, and I wanted a Timex Ironman with the then still-new-to-the-market tech called Indiglo.

So, sometime in March of 1994, my parents and I stopped by The Bay (a Canadian department store) en route to the movie theater. Armed with a king’s ransom of gift money from my Grandma (no more than $50, which made me a one-percenter in the world of Canadian 8-year-olds), I bought my first watch. It was, and remains, a black-on-grey example of a very early Indiglo-equipped Timex Ironman Triathlon, fitted to a black resin strap. While Timex undoubtedly designed it for athletes in training, I could not so much as hope to conceal how happy I was with this little watch, and its cutting-edge electroluminescent backlight. I recall watching a VHS copy of Beethoven’s 2nd sometime later, and being surprised by just how much of the film I had missed as I endlessly engaged that smooth blue-green backlight in the dark theatre.”

 

ALL IMAGES AND QUOTED TEXT FROM HODINKEE